Talk To Me Mundane

The mundane is a key part of our daily lives. We all have to brush our teeth and commute to work or school. We pass by the same buildings and see the same people begging for change. Does it have to be this way for everything? One part of our day that should be more dynamic is conversation. No, I’m not talking about complaints, small talk, or the same reminders we feel so obligated to repeat. What was the last book you read? What scene captured your attention? Was it a fiction novel? Who was the main character? These questions don’t require raging debates or academic style answers. They serve to perk our attention.

The sounds that escape our open mouths establish a connection with another person. We use speech to communicate our ideas and thoughts. Talking is an action that occurs everyday, and depending on the context, requires a range of concentration. Not being able to talk is, unfortunately, a possibility due to certain medical conditions that prevent the body from doing so in mental and physical ways. When these sounds become so establish in our head that we push them to background noise, I think a change is needed. Not engaging conversation directly is a breakdown of communication and it allows conversation to become one sided.

What calls for mundane talk? I would say it’s the act of preventing yourself from capturing the attention of others. Complaining is a huge turnoff for people because it underlines a commitment to not act. These people find more comfort in complaining than in actually resolving what is being complained about. It becomes an example of what I like to call passive communication. If you want to drive push people away, building a wall of complains will help you achieve this goal.

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ballofdaniel3

I blog about soccer, which is my passion and interest, because it has given me a lot of moments in which I have used the parts that make me human. History, life, and the other stuff I write about are the seasoning to all of this.

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